IP and BREXIT: The facts

The UK government has given further reassurances to business that EU intellectual property rights will continue to be protected in the UK after Brexit.

On 12 July 2018 the UK government published a White Paper on the future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union, setting out an important vision for elements of the future relationship between the UK and EU on IP.

Find all the information and updates on Brexit and IP on the UK IP Office's website here and share with them your views on the topic.

CEIPI-ICTSD: IP and digital trade in the age of AI and big data

The Center for International Intellectual Property Studies (CEIPI) in collaboration with the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) has published the fifth issue of the CEIPI-ICTSD publications series on Global Perspectives and Challenges for the IP System.

This publication series provides high-quality academic and policy-oriented papers dealing with topics that are of global relevance due to their normative pre-eminence, economic relevance and socio-economic impact.

This fifth issue is dedicated to intellectual property and digital trade in the age of artificial intelligence and big data, and is divided into:

  • From digital trade to commercialisation and management of IP.
  • Regulating and using big data in the digital world.

Find further information and download the publication on CEIPI's website here.

European IPR Helpdesk Bulletin Issue (30)

This Bulletin issue is dedicated to IP infringement and enforcement focusing on common IP infringements and the enforcement actions that are available to stop them.

WIPO introduces the topic of IP enforcement in the international context by building respect for IP. EUIPO speaks about the third edition of the Enforcement Database Forum and the upcoming IP Enforcement Portal, while Barbara Weizsäcker, Secretary General at EEIA and EMECA, develops the topic of IP protection at trade fairs and exhibitions through an infringement case which occurred at a German international exhibition.

In this issue we have interviewed a financial news website that explains to us how it was accused of filing its EUTM in bad faith. EPO tells us about the future of patent litigation in Europe with an article on the Unified Patent Court, and 4iP Council describes how to protect your IP rights from wilful infringement.

In addition, Aktion Plagiarius e.V. provides us with an interview on counterfeiting practices and its Plagiarius Prizes.

As per usual, the Bulletin reports information about the European IPR Helpdesk’s past and future events together with the latest updates from our Helpline service, as well as a brand-new IP infringement and enforcement quiz and our usual patent quiz.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

Consultation: EUIPO and the fight against infringement of IPRs

The European Commission has launched a consultation to collect the views of citizens and stakeholders on whether Regulation 386/2012 entrusting the EU Intellectual Property Office with new tasks has met its objective of facilitating and supporting the activities of national authorities, the private sector and EU institutions in the fight against infringements of intellectual property rights, in particular counterfeiting and piracy.

All citizens and organisations are welcome to contribute to this consultation, which will be opened until 2 October 2018. 

You can contribute by filling in the online questionnaire, available in the 23 official EU languages here

Winners of first EU Blockathon announced

The winners of EU Blockathon 2018, which took place from 22-25 June in Brussels, have been announced. The event was the first hackathon dedicated to developing blockchain-based solutions to fight against counterfeiting. 

The Blockathon aimed to explore the potential of blockchain technology to better protect supply chains from infiltration by counterfeit goods.

Find out more about the innovative technologies developed by the finalists and winners here

IP enforcement: asserting your rights

Intellectual property (IP) can be protected by, among others, IP rights or titles, such as trade marks or patents. Such titles are usually thought to confer negative rights, which means the right to exclude others from using or commercialising, for example, an invention protected under a patent.

This process of not allowing others to use or commercialise protected IP is known as enforcement of rights, which can be done through civil, administrative and penal measures aimed at preventing the unauthorised use of intellectual property, sanctioning such use and providing remedies to right holders for the damage caused by such unauthorised use.

This Fact Sheet illustrates the importance of IP enforcement for businesses and research organisations while providing an overview of the main enforcement actions, together with the latest developments and initiatives of the European Commission in the field.

EC factsheet: Modern EU Copyright rules for European culture to flourish and circulate

The European Commission has recently published a factsheet summarising different aspects of the EU's current situation regarding copyright rules.

A variety of interesting facts are explained in this comprehensive document, including the need to reform EU copyright legislation and the evolution of the legislative process up to today. 

To find out more, click here

Secto Design: Making use of design rights when competing with infringers

Design protection is sometimes undervalued, being considered after patent and trade mark rights for businesses when it comes to IP protection. However, design is a crucial element in identifying a company’s innovative brilliance to its clients, and protection of design rights is generally a very straightforward process.

In this Case Study, a Finnish SME shows us the importance of taking concrete steps for design protection to increase the company’s value, and how it deters potential free riders from infringing on their products.

Vtree Energy: Building a solar future through intellectual property

Innovative products provide competitive advantage for their owners as long as proper intellectual property (IP) protection measures are taken. In order to ensure a product’s market success, and combat potential infringers successfully, it is necessary to take all characteristics of the product into account, and consider IP in a broader aspect.

This Case Study from Romania presents a real-life example on the significance of IP, when a company’s business strategy is based on new and innovative products or services.