Banking on IP? The role of intellectual property and intangible assets in facilitating business finance

The United Kingdom Intellectual Property Office has published a summary of a study concerning banking on Intellectual Property: Banking on IP? The role of intellectual property and intangible assets in facilitating business finance. This study aims to analyse how effectively small and medium sized-enterprises in the United Kingdom are able to use intangible assets, and particularly Intellectual Property, for financing purposes. Several recommendations are put forward at the end of the summary.

The full report is to be made available shortly and in the meantime you can read the executive summary here.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

Commercialising Intellectual Property: Assignment Agreements

“Commercialising IP” is a series of fact sheets published by the European IPR Helpdesk aiming at providing an introduction to various forms of commercialisation which can be useful for less experienced readers who may likely be involved in the exploitation of intangible assets. Content provided therein is not intended to be exhaustive, and seeking professional advice is strongly recommended when it comes to choosing the most suitable commercialisation practice for your organisation and dealing with the complex legal issues surrounding these agreements. Hence, with these guides we aim to provide you with an understanding of the basic principles, which can help you saving time and money.

This fact sheet deals with the assignment of intellectual property rights. An assignment can be beneficial in many business circumstances. Examples may be when your company does not have the means to undertake commercialisation or prefers to receive a once-off lump sum payment for the innovative technology. This implies no later concerns regarding the maintenance and enforcement of the intellectual property rights. Assignments can also be very beneficial within the context of collaborative research: for example in the case of a transfer of IP ownership from one of the collaborative research partners to another organisation. Therefore, it is important to understand “what is an IP assignment” as it can be an effective route for the exploitation of your intellectual property. In this fact sheet you can also find an outline of the main provisions of an assignment agreement as well as a checklist to remind you of the most important steps when negotiating an assignment.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

Commercialising Intellectual Property: Internal Product Development

“Commercialising IP” is a series of fact sheets aiming to provide an introduction to the forms of commercialisation that can be useful for the less advanced public likely to be involved in exploitation of intangible assets. The content provided therein is not intended to be exhaustive, and professional advice is strongly recommended when it comes to choosing the most suitable commercialisation practice for your organisation and dealing with the complex legal issues surrounding these agreements. However, with these guides we aim to give you some understanding of the basic principles, which can help you save money and time.

This fact sheet deals with internal product development. Whether you develop software, or are in the fashion industry, create and sell furniture or technology devices, you are developing intangible assets. Indeed, nowadays every business has websites, develops its own brands, even non-technological small businesses. Others, such as many start-ups, only have intangible assets. Developing products internally and commercialising them therefore requires the proper management of the intellectual property created by the business and possibly embedded in the product. The purpose of this fact sheet is to give you a handy checklist of the most common tasks required in the management of intellectual property during the different stages of a product’s development cycle.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

Intellectual Property Valuation

Licensing and assignments of intellectual property rights have become common in the market, and the use of these types of asset as loan security has grown. This new reality has given rise to the growing importance of valuation of intangibles. Trading an asset requires knowing its value. Several methodologies are commonly used in the market to value these assets.

The European IPR Helpdesk has developed a new fact sheet where the different methodologies will be explained and examples of scenarios of possible use of these methodologies are given. Different tools have been created by public organisations to assist companies performing valuations. These free tools will also be presented in this document to help you save time and money.

Comment this article on our LinkedIn group

Commercialising Intellectual Property: Spin-offs

“Commercialising IP” is a series of fact sheets aiming to provide an introduction to the forms of commercialisation that can be useful for a less advanced public likely to be involved in exploitation of intangible assets. The content provided therein is not intended to be exhaustive, and professional advice is strongly recommended when it comes to choosing the most suitable commercialisation practice for your organisation and dealing with the complex legal issues surrounding these deals. Yet, with these guides we aim to give you some understanding of the basic principles, which can help you save money and time.

This fact sheet focuses on spin-off, also known as “spin-out”, intended as a separate legal entity created by a parent organisation (PO) to exploit its intellectual property (IP) assets. Once the company is established, the PO will transfer or license to it the IP concerned, in order for the spin-off to commercialise it. This fact sheet identifies the key factors to create a well-conceived spin-off company with a main emphasis on the IP-related aspects that can contribute to its success. Spin-off is considered as a common practice in Universities and Research Organisations (ROs), in order for them to exploit and maximise the economic benefits of the knowledge created, as often these organisations lack the required capabilities to market their intangibles.

Comment this article on our LinkedIn group

Commercialising Intellectual Property: Licence Agreements

This booklet is a follow-up to the “Commercialising IP” series, providing an introduction to the forms of commercialisation that can be useful for people involved in exploitation of intangible assets.

This particular fact sheet aims to clarify when licence agreements should be used. Moreover, in this document we highlight the key provisions seen in most licensing agreements, as well as the specifics of licensing certain types of intellectual property rights.

Follow the link below to download this hands-on document.

Comment this article on our LinkedIn group

Commercialising Intellectual Property: Joint Ventures

“Commercialising IP” is a series of fact sheets aiming to provide an introduction to the forms of commercialisation that can be useful for less advanced public likely to be involved in the exploitation of intangible assets. Content provided therein is not intended to be exhaustive and professional advice is strongly recommended when it comes to choose the most suitable commercialisation practice to your organisation.

The present fact sheet focuses on joint ventures (JV) and will put forward some practical and legal issues, mainly from the perspective of the ownership and exploitation of IP, to be considered at all stages of these projects. It tries to point out that if organisations anticipated and properly managed most of the legal risks, they would be able to maximise the financial gains that such settlements are aimed at.  Overall, joint ventures have the goal to further develop and/or commercialise intellectual assets belonging to existing organisations, through a separate legal entity or in project collaborations. In both cases, venture partners will license or assign their IP for it to be used for the scope of the JV.  Joint venture practices are widely spread across the industry sectors, but also occur in the academic environment.

Comment this article on our LinkedIn group