IP management for drug discovery expertise in the Baltics

An EU-funded project designed to strengthen multidisciplinary research capacities, and to better manage intellectual property (IP) issues surrounding innovative drug discovery, has been launched.

In particular, this project aims to strengthen the management of IP and human resources for innovative drug discovery at LIOS (Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis). There will be planned training on Horizon 2020 and IP management issues, which will increase the institute's competitiveness. In this way, the project will not only unlock the existing research and innovation capacities of LIOS, it will contribute to research and innovation capacity building in the Baltic region.

For further information on the project, please click here and here.

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European IPR Helpdesk Bulletin Issue (11)

We are pleased to inform you that the eleventh issue of the European IPR Helpdesk Bulletin has been released and is now available on-line.

This issue is thicker than the previous ones as our Bulletin comes to the end of its third year of publication. We thus decided to give space to more topics matching the interests of all our target groups. The publication starts with an article on Open Access (OA) in FP7 and Horizon 2020. A policy officer from DG Research & Innovation explains the importance and potential benefits of OA for the European Research Area, together with the activities of the European Commission to foster the utilisation of this dissemination tool in EU-funded programmes. The following article sticks with the EU framework programmes and offers an overview on intellectual property (IP) in Horizon 2020, with a focus on comparison with FP7.

Realising the benefits from IP requires its conscious and appropriate management. The article on IP valuation outlines the principal methods in practice. A INTA contribution points out in ten FAQ how SMEs can effectively use the Madrid System. Small businesses are again the target of two IP tools, providing information on how to use their intangibles.

Our close collaboration with Enterprise Europe Network has produced two other pieces. One introduces the publication of IPR Guidelines, created for the Network advisers to guide their clients through the IP process from idea generation to commercial revenue. The second one is an interview with one of the European IPR Helpdesk Ambassadors from Turkey, who shares with us his thoughts on the benefits and opportunities that the scheme offers to him and his clients.

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Publishing v. patenting

Usually, the two main means to bring technical and scientific knowledge to the public are patent applications and journal publications. With the advent of the internet two alternative means are available: the defensive publications and the open access model.
The European IPR Helpdesk has issued a new fact sheet examining the different aspects of these knowledge dissemination tools, also taking into account the different needs and objectives of research organisations/universities (ROs) and small and medium sized enterprises/industry (SMEs). There is not a general rule to apply when choosing the right means of dissemination, but one needs to ensure that the chosen tools are in line with the overall organisation's strategy.

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Commercialising Intellectual Property: Spin-offs

“Commercialising IP” is a series of fact sheets aiming to provide an introduction to the forms of commercialisation that can be useful for a less advanced public likely to be involved in exploitation of intangible assets. The content provided therein is not intended to be exhaustive, and professional advice is strongly recommended when it comes to choosing the most suitable commercialisation practice for your organisation and dealing with the complex legal issues surrounding these deals. Yet, with these guides we aim to give you some understanding of the basic principles, which can help you save money and time.

This fact sheet focuses on spin-off, also known as “spin-out”, intended as a separate legal entity created by a parent organisation (PO) to exploit its intellectual property (IP) assets. Once the company is established, the PO will transfer or license to it the IP concerned, in order for the spin-off to commercialise it. This fact sheet identifies the key factors to create a well-conceived spin-off company with a main emphasis on the IP-related aspects that can contribute to its success. Spin-off is considered as a common practice in Universities and Research Organisations (ROs), in order for them to exploit and maximise the economic benefits of the knowledge created, as often these organisations lack the required capabilities to market their intangibles.

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IP due diligence: assessing value and risks of intangibles


We are pleased to announce you that the European IPR Helpdesk has issued a new fact sheet on IP due diligence. The knowledge of this intricate topic is fundamental for organizations having the purpose to acquire IP, raising capital and seeking financial assistance. Although IP due diligence is a precondition for any capital investment, it can be helpful for enforcing IP rights and reducing the IP-related costs as well. In a few words, IP due diligence can be considered as an essential process when developing an IP strategy.

This fact sheet has the scope of illustrating when, why and how to conduct IP due diligence mainly from an SME perspective, in order to increase its marketability. Nevertheless its content is suitable for investigations carried out by any organisation, such as public and private RTOs (Research and Technology Organisations) and universities.

Follow the link below to know more about this issue.

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Raising IP Awareness at University to Convert Knowledge into Benefits

We are pleased to inform you that we are now ready to release a new series of publications concerning case studies. Generally, the case is considered as an instance of real-life context. Our case studies are brief exemplary or cautionary documents analysing a subject from which it is possible to stress successful or failure factors. Therefore, we will offer you the opportunity to come across some case studies presenting not only examples to follow but also mistakes to avoid, and from the reading of which you should be able to infer some useful and helpful conclusions.

The first case study has been produced in collaboration with Own-it, an IP service established within the University of the Arts London. Own-it's case has been selected as an instructive example of a first-line IP advice so as to highlight the importance of setting up an IP centre within academic institutions. This service's purpose is to confer a holistic approach to IP education and management, to convert knowledge into socio-economic benefits. This indeed matches the guidelines given by the European Commission in its “Recommendation on the management of intellectual property in knowledge transfer activities for universities and other public research organisations”.

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