Open Access to scientific publications and research data in Horizon 2020: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Affordable and easy access to scientific information is very important for the scientific community itself, but also increasingly important for innovative small businesses. Improving access to scientific information is also about increasing openness and transparency, which are essential features of Responsible Research and Innovation and contributes to better policy-making.

All projects receiving Horizon 2020 funding will have the obligation to make sure any peer-reviewed journal article which they publish is openly accessible, free of charge.

This fact sheet is written as a frequently asked questions (FAQ) document, in order to answer queries received from Horizon 2020 applicants. This fact sheet should be read in parallel with the “Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020”.

Comment on this article in our Linkedin group

Report on ‘Standardisation in the Area of Innovation and Technological Development, Notably in the Field of Text and Data Mining’

Text and data mining (TDM) is an important technique for analysing and extracting new insights and knowledge from the exponentially increasing store of digital data (‘Big Data’). It is important to understand the extent to which the EU’s current legal framework encourages or obstructs this new form of research and to assess the scale of the economic issues at stake.

TDM represents a significant economic opportunity for Europe. At present, the use of TDM tools by researchers in Europe appears to be lower than in its main competitors. In the legal issues section a description is offered of the application of different intellectual property laws and the extent to which TDM in Europe is facilitated by any existing exceptions to either EU copyright or database law. The application of a copyright and database exception relating to teaching or scientific research is optional and has not been implemented at all in some Member States. This has contributed to uncertainty in the European scientific research community.

There is a serious risk that Europe’s relative competitive position as a research location for the exploitation of digital data will deteriorate further, if steps are not taken to address the issues discussed in this report prepared for the EC Directorate-General for Research and Innovation by a Group of Experts.

The full report is available here.

Comment on this article in our Linkedin group

European IPR Helpdesk templates on NDAs and MoUs updated

We are pleased to inform you that the European IPR Helpdesk has updated its Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs)  that can now be used independently of the kind of negotiations that you enter into, both in the context of EU-funded projects and for international partnerships.

In addition to that, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for Horizon 2020 has been created. Alongside the one already available for FP7, the new document reflects the few changes brought by the new Horizon 2020 rules.

All these templates can be found and freely downloaded in the European IPR Helpdesk online library, under useful documents.

Comment on this article in our Linkedin group

IP Marketplace

IP Marketplace is managed by the Danish Patent and Trademark Office and is an online display window where you can look for trading partners and other kinds of partnership. IP Marketplace is free of charge for both buyers and sellers.

At IP Marketplace you can put your patents, patent applications, utility models, design and trade marks - so-called IP rights - up for sale or out-licensing. You can also use IP Marketplace when searching for IP rights to buy or in-license, or when you are looking for partners for innovation projects that build on patentable knowledge.

You can access IP Marketplace here.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

Exploitation channels for public research results

This fact sheet has the aim to present tools, tips and practices for public research organisations (PROs) to convert the knowledge resulting from publicly funded research activities into socio-economic benefits. This can be achieved in different ways, not only through direct commercialisation tools, but also via collaborative or contract research conducted in co-operation with or commissioned by the industry. In so doing, the dissemination and transfer of the generated knowledge to the market would therefore be ensured, with the objective of creating products and services to enhance social welfare.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

IP assets for financial advantages

Besides the research activity, the costs of developing a new technology into a product and then marketing it are generally very high. Moreover, it is common for many small businesses to have little money to commercialise their innovations, for which they usually seek support from national financial schemes.

This fact sheet gives an overview of the different means at the disposal of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and research organisations (ROs) to access finance, in order to obtain liquidity from their intangible. The aim is to show that IP can be used as leverage for attracting investors, as collateral for obtaining credit and loans as well as receivables for securitisations. All of this can derive from banks, equity investors and the public sector.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

Horizon 2020 research programme approved by the European Parliament

Horizon 2020 was approved by MEPs on Thursday, November 21. Parliament amended it to improve support for small firms, attract more people into science and more scientists to join the programme, and earmark funding for non-fossil energy research.

Several amendments also concern the European Commission proposal for laying down the rules for participation and dissemination in Horizon 2020, having the aim to simplify the granting procedure and better exploit the research results.

The agreed budget for 2014-2020 is €70.2 billion (at 2011 prices). The biggest headings are "Societal challenges" (39% of the total budget), "Excellent science" (32%) and "Industrial leadership"(22%).

After Parliament's vote, the programme needs to be formally adopted by EU member states too, in the coming weeks. The programme starts on 1 January 2014.

To read the press release, please click here. To access the agreed rules for participation and dissemination and other background notes, here.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group

Automatic Patent Analysis

Experts reckon that much of the technical information contained in patents is not available anywhere else, and that it contains around 80% of the worldwide technical knowledge.

However, patent information analysis is not easy: patent documents are abundant, lengthy and are written in very technical language. Thus, reading and analysing patent documents can be complex and time consuming. This is where the use of Automatic Patent Analysis (APA) can help.

This new fact sheet produced by the European IPR Helpdesk provides some useful tools and explains how to perform an APA, in order for researchers and SME to integrate patent information more easily into their activities.

Comment this article on our Linkedin group