New fact sheet on the Plan for the Exploitation and Dissemination of Results in Horizon 2020

We are pleased to inform you that the European IPR Helpdesk has published a new fact sheet on the Plan for the Exploitation and Dissemination of Results in Horizon 2020.

Exploitation and dissemination are integral part of the European research and innovation funding and certain obligations in this regard arise at the project proposal stage. The Horizon 2020 work programme 2014-2015 explicitly specifies that project proposals shall include a draft Plan for the Exploitation and Dissemination of Results (PEDR).

The aim of this fact sheet is to outline the main characteristics and scope of the PEDR in Horizon 2020 and to tackle the issues that participants in Horizon 2020 may encounter when preparing the PEDR.

The fact sheet is available here.

 

The Plan for the Exploitation and Dissemination of Results in Horizon 2020

Exploitation and dissemination are integral part of the European research and innovation funding and certain obligations in this regard arise at the project proposal stage. The Horizon 2020 work programme 2014-2015 explicitly specifies that project proposals shall include a draft Plan for the Exploitation and Dissemination of Results (PEDR).
The aim of this fact sheet is to outline the main characteristics and scope of the PEDR and to tackle the issues that participants in Horizon 2020 may encounter when preparing the PEDR.

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Report on Protection and Enforcement of IP Rights in key third countries: A guide for EU’s rights holders with their business strategies

The European Commission has realized its biennial report on Protection and Enforcement of IP Rights in third countries as a useful information source for European SMEs for better managing their risks around their IP, when developing their business operations in those countries. While assessing the latest IPR situation, the report also draws detailed arguments on progresses, concerns and improvement areas in IP for those countries outside EU.

You can access further information and the full report here.

Interviews on Intellectual property with successful innovators

Talented business people are sharing their opinions of intellectual property (IP) in their field and insights into their time in education. These experiences will be of interest to business start-ups as source of information and best practices.

You can find the interviews here.

 

More than 11.5 million documents in open access are now available in OpenAIRE

OpenAIRE stands for Open Access Infrastructure for Research in Europe and its mission is to gather the research outputs and metadata from EU funded research projects. With over 60 new data providers, OpenAIRE is now hosting more than 11.5 million documents and collects all global open access research outputs.

Beneficiaries of EU funded projects, who are required to publish into open access, can find useful information on open access repositories or open access journals on the OpenAIRE website here.

 

European IPR Helpdesk Bulletin Issue (17)

We are pleased to inform you that a new issue of the European IPR Helpdesk Bulletin has been released and is now available on-line.

In this issue we start by providing you with some new important aspects under Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions.            

This Bulletin then brings you useful information related to counterfeiting and IP enforcement in Europe, including the advantages of the IP customs action as an effective tool against counterfeiting and Effective Dispute Resolution, a tool guiding the parties of a proceeding before the OHIM’s Board of Appeals in the resolution of their disputes.

You will also discover the importance of developing an IP protection strategy at the earlier stage of the conception of business models, as well as the functioning of WIPO Translate, a useful tool developed by the World Intellectual Property Organization.

As always, we also bring you a little patent quiz and information about training and events. In addition, this issue also has some fresh news on the Helpline service.

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IP management in Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions

Intellectual property (IP) management is a very important part of any successful project within the Horizon 2020 framework programme. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (MSC) Actions are not an exception and participants should take the time to understand the IP rules and establish an effective and tailored plan for the protection and exploitation of research results and intellectual property (IP) arising within their projects.
The aim of this fact sheet is to outline the main IP-related issues that participants in Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions should consider in the different stages of their projects.

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Intellectual property management in open innovation

During recent decades, the R&D field has witnessed a rise in technological complexity. This entails the presence of a pool of intellectual property (IP) rights within the most advanced products and services. Also considering that the number of patent filings increases steadily, companies therefore have to rely on third party IP rights to innovate.
 
A natural outcome of this multi-invention background is the need for companies to cooperate with other research and technology development performers (RTDs) in order to produce innovative solutions.
 
This fact sheet aims to highlight the importance of the open innovation model as an opportunity for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) as well as for research and technology organisations (RTOs), and to highlight the issues to be taken into account for a proper management of IP when innovating through open approaches.
 
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Intellectual property and business plans

A business plan is a strategic document providing details on how a given innovation is going to be commercialised and brought to the market by an existing company or a newly created venture.

Since the scope of the business plan is to describe not only the business logic behind the commercialisation plans, but also the assets and resources that will make the business successful, the definition of a strong intellectual property (IP) protection and management policy and the business planning exercise are strongly interconnected.

First of all, the IP owned by or accessible to the company owners will strongly influence the business model chosen for operating on the market. Secondly, the business plan will typically refer to intellectual property (IP) and intellectual property rights (IPR)-protected elements to describe the company's unique specificities and the assets and resources that can be called upon for establishing win-win collaborations with clients, partners and investors. Finally, the comparison of those assets with the IPR owned or likely to be acquired by both clients and competitors are to be considered key indicators of the commercial viability of the business and should influence its strategic positioning inside the broader ecosystem.

IP should therefore be taken into consideration both when drafting the global strategy that will be described in the business plan and when actually writing the document itself.

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