IP enforcement: asserting your rights

Intellectual property (IP) can be protected by, among others, IP rights or titles, such as trade marks or patents. Such titles are usually thought to confer negative rights, which means the right to exclude others from using or commercialising, for example, an invention protected under a patent.

This process of not allowing others to use or commercialise protected IP is known as enforcement of rights, which can be done through civil, administrative and penal measures aimed at preventing the unauthorised use of intellectual property, sanctioning such use and providing remedies to right holders for the damage caused by such unauthorised use.

This Fact Sheet illustrates the importance of IP enforcement for businesses and research organisations while providing an overview of the main enforcement actions, together with the latest developments and initiatives of the European Commission in the field.

IP in Education — Education Council adopts conclusions on the future of European education

The Education Council, composed of the education ministers of the European Union, has recently adopted conclusions on moving towards a vision of a European education area as well as recommendations on lifelong learning. 

This far-reaching EU document, which sets out the roadmap for all Member States in its design of educational programmes, acknowledges the work of the IP in Education network managed by the EUIPO and recognises the efforts made by the Observatory's stakeholders and the work the Task Force. 

For further information, click here

WIPO: The World Intellectual Property Day 2018 celebrated women's accomplishments

Every 26th April we celebrate the World IP Day, an initiative of WIPO's member states to raise public awareness about the role of IP in daily life, and to celebrate the contribution made by innovators and creators to the development of societies across the globe.

This year, the World IP Day campaign celebrated the brilliance, ingenuity, curiosity and courage of the women who are driving change in our world and shaping our common future. New WIPO figures show the highest-ever rate of women inventors, especially in the biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and chemistry fields, but a gender gap persists. 

Find out more here

The European IPR Helpdesk is looking for case studies: tell us about your IP success story

Would you like your IP success story to be known by thousands of people around Europe?

What about becoming a source of inspiration to SMEs, institutions and researchers?

Tempted?

Then, tell your story as one of the European IPR Helpdesk's case studies and we will spread your success all around Europe!

Case studies are part of the range of publications developed by the European IPR Helpdesk in order to increase awareness of IP. Case studies contain concrete examples on how SMEs, institutions or academics use IP to achieve business success.

The European IPR Helpdesk disseminates case studies free of charge to an audience of more than 13,000 people through its website and through its newsletters, with around 8,000 subscribers.

Check our library if you would like to find out more about our case studies and contact the European IPR Helpdesk's IP advisors, Alejandra Aluja (alejandra.aluja@iprhelpdesk.eu) and Paula Barnola (paula.barnola@iprhelpdesk.eu), if you would like your case study published by the European IPR Helpdesk.

We are looking forward to hearing about your success story!

TNtech: The ABC of IP strategy for a small R&D company

Transforming the results of R&D into commercially viable products is a business challenge that must be carried out in conformity with a coherent IP strategy. Such a strategy helps save time and resources. Additionally, a sound IP strategy is a key element in avoiding and fighting against infringement and unfair competition practices carried out by competitors. 

In this new case study, TNtech, a Slovakian SME, tells us about the main measures adopted within the framework of its IP strategy and shares some useful advice with us. 

The first EU-wide interactive website dedicated to young people and IP is launched

Ideas Powered, an initiative of the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), has launched its website on www.ideaspowered.eu, the first EU-wide interactive website on intellectual property for young people.

With animated and clear outlook, the website aims to create primary awareness on IP and IP counterfeiting issues for youngsters by providing them accurate information and by seeking young Europeans' active contribution with social media channels, blogs and even with competitions.

To access the press release of the OHIM on this news, please click here.

The German Patent and Trade Mark Office allows online inspection of patent and utility model files

As of January 2014, electronic file inspection of patent and utility model files is possible at the German Patent and Trade Mark Office (DPMA).

From now on, parts of files can also be inspected online. The documents available for electronic inspection include office actions, decisions, search reports as well as communications relevant to the procedure and other parts of files in PDF format. Entering the file number and clicking on the button "File inspection" in the free-of-charge information service DPMAregister will lead you to the requested information. All granted patents, registered utility models as well as all applications filed that have already been published on or after 21 January 2013 will be available.

For further information, please click here.

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Publishing v. patenting

Usually, the two main means to bring technical and scientific knowledge to the public are patent applications and journal publications. With the advent of the internet two alternative means are available: the defensive publications and the open access model.
 
The European IPR Helpdesk has issued a new fact sheet examining the different aspects of these knowledge dissemination tools, also taking into account the different needs and objectives of research organisations/universities (ROs) and small and medium sized enterprises/industry (SMEs). There is not a general rule to apply when choosing the right means of dissemination, but one needs to ensure that the chosen tools are in line with the overall organisation's strategy.

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EPO adds six new languages to its Patent Translate service

In a move to further improve multilingual access to information contained in patent documents, the European Patent Office (EPO) made another set of European languages available in its free machine translation service Patent Translate. With the addition of Bulgarian, Czech, Icelandic, Romanian, Slovak and Slovenian, the service now offers on-the-fly-translation from and into English for 21 languages. It is accessible on the EPO's free online patent database, Espacenet.

By the end of 2014 Patent Translate is expected to cover all 28 languages of the EPO's 38 member states, plus Russian and the major Asian languages. The service will then constitute the world's most comprehensive multilingual platform for patent information.

To get started with the Patent Translate service, please click here.

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